Tag Archives: EAL

So vs. Such Dice

Snip, snip.  A bit of glue.  Job done.

Bringing a bit of craft to the classroom for younger learners.  These dice addi a bit of personalisation to practising so and such with adjectives.  A little bit of imagination, a couple of cuts, a dab of glue and hey presto!

PRACTICE:

  • so + adjective + that …
  • such an + adjective + noun

WHO IS IT FOR?

  • Level (CEFR A2-B2)
  • Ages 9 yrs. and older

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Speechless

No words …

People have probably been playing charades at parties since long before crabsticks were invented.  Speechless is like a hardcore version of charades, but with more giggles and a couple of extra rules to organise the fun – GREAT for vocab review.

PRACTICE:
  • vocabulary review

WHO IS IT FOR?

  • Level (CEFR B1-C2)
  • Ages 12 and up

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Inside Job

What all vocabulary games need: a good dose of subterfuge

Most teachers would agree that regular review is a super important part of learning vocabulary.  Either as a warmer or an end-of-lesson filler, these games are useful tools to have in your TEFL arsenal.  This one is also a lot of fun, has just the right amount of competition, and is nicely interactive.

PRACTICE:

  • vocabulary review
  • present speculation
  • critical thinking

WHO IS IT FOR?

  • Level (CEFR B1-C2)
  • Ages 12 yrs. and older

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Codenames

The famous word-association game.

PRACTICE:

  • reviewing vocabulary (meaning and associations)
  • Cambridge: First, Advanced and Proficiency Reading and Use of English Part 1 tasks a bit more fun.

WHO IS IT FOR?

  • Level (CEFR B1-C2)
  • Ages 12 yrs. and up

THE RUNTHROUGH:

When I saw that Codenames was the #1 party game on Board Game Geek (seeing as there are FOUR HUNDRED AND TWENTY ONE games on that particular list),  I went out and purchased it immediately.  But, does it live up to the hype?

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Wits and Wagers

TEFLGamer does not condone teachers using gambling in the EFL classroom as an additional revenue stream.

PRACTICE:

  • Numbers, years, percentages, weights and measures
  • speculation
  • hedging (sounding less certain)

WHO IS IT FOR?

  • Level (CEFR A2-C1)
  • Ages 12 and older

THE RUNTHROUGH:

For the EFL / ESL classroom, Wits and Wagers is an excellent fit.  At it’s heart, it’s a party trivia game where knowing the right answer isn’t as important as knowing who in the room is most likely to know the answer.  Straight out of the box, there will be giggles galore when you bring this one to class.

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Snake Oil

This time next year, we’ll be millionaires.

PRACTICE:

  • relative clauses (describing)
  • pronunciation of compound nouns
  • linking ideas
  • clauses of contrast
  • negative inversion for emphasis
  • making a convincing pitch

WHO IS IT FOR?

  • Advanced and up (CEFR C1-C2)
  • Upper secondary and older (ages 15 years plus)

THE RUNTHROUGH:

Snake Oil is a party game where the players create a products to pitch to prospective buyers.  The game is a lot of fun and it is extremely rich linguistically.

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Once Upon a Time

Are you sitting comfortably?  Then I’ll begin …

PRACTICE:

  • narrative tenses (past progressive, past perfect simple/progressive)
  • storytelling
  • vocabulary (fairy tales and folk tales)

WHO IS IT FOR?

  • Upper-Intermediate and higher (CEFR B2-C2)
  • 15-17 (Can work with students aged 18+, but only if they are a light-hearted bunch)

THE RUNTHROUGH:

Once Upon a Time has a long tradition in education, both mainstream and EFL.  So much in fact, that I almost feel a bit cheeky writing about it, to be honest.  I only decided to write about it as it seems to have criminally fallen off people’s radar in recent years.

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Apples to Apples

How d’you like them apples?
Quite a lot actually.

PRACTICE:

  • vocabulary (general + most idioms)
  • persuading
  • explaining
  • describing

WHO IS IT FOR?

  • Level (CEFR B2-C2)
  • Ages 12 and older

THE RUNTHROUGH:

Apples to Apples is one of the classics.  From what I hear, it’s been quite popular in the US as a family game for some time, but it’s only recently popped onto my radar.  It is a fantastically versatile game and is a great way of engaging students to practice lots of different kinds of vocabulary.  From the original adjective version, all the way to idioms.

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Sheriff of Nottingham

Ducking and diving, wheeling and dealing, bribery and lies.  What could go wrong?

PRACTICE:

  • negotiating, bartering and haggling
  • agreeing and disagreeing
  • real conditionals (making suggestions)
  • hesitating

WHO IS IT FOR?

  • Upper-Intermediate learners and up (CEFR B2-C2)
  • Ages 15+

THE RUNTHROUGH:

Sheriff of Nottingham is one of the few games which works just fine straight out of the box.  If you’ve never heard of or played Sheriff of Nottingham (SoN), then you should definitely try it twice.  Why twice?  Because you’ll learn so much about the game the first play through, that it’d be a shame not to play it again.

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FunEmployed

Help Wanted.

PRACTICE:

  • clauses of purpose
  • linking and organising ideas
  • negative inversion for emphasis
  • cleft sentences
  • UPDATED: gerunds and infinitives

WHO IS IT FOR?

  • Higher levels (CEFR C1-C2)
  • Ages 15+

THE RUNTHROUGH:

Funemployed sells itself as a satirical party game.  It is not wrong. It’s a lot of fun both in the classroom and over a few drinks with some less prudish friends.  Players need to be able to both think on their feet and spin a good yarn.  In short, this is a game for bullsh*tters.  With the right group, FunEmployed is absolutely splendid.

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